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Cholov Yisroel: Milk which is produced under constant rabbinical supervision and products made from such milk.

Chometz: Leavening or leavened bread, not permitted for Passover. Chometz may also be used to denote any product or utensil that is not kosher for Passover.

Fleishig: Derived from the Yiddish “fleish” (meat). Colloquially used to denote meat foods, dishes, and utensils.

Glatt Kosher: Meat which is determined to be in accordance with the highest standards of Kashrus, and whose standards are without question.

Hecksher: Written certification of kashruth signed by a Rabbi, Vaad HaKashruth (council for kashruth supervision) or seal of a recognized kashruth-certifying agency.

Kasher: To “make Kosher,” usually applied to the salting and soaking procedures used in the production of kosher meat and poultry. Also used to describe the procedure for preparing (cleaning) a non-kosher facility so that it may be used for preparing kosher food.

Kashruth: The general term used to denote every aspect of food prepared according to Jewish law and proper for the Jewish table.

Kosher: Literally, “fit, proper or correct.” Describes food that is permissible to eat under Jewish dietary laws.

Kosher for Passover: In addition to meeting the year-round requirements for kosher, the food product also meets the Passover dietary laws, which prohibit the use of leavened grain products.

Mevushal: Term used to designate that kosher wine has been pasteurized.

Mehadrin: Used to connote that foods are prepared in accordance with the strictest kosher standards.\

Milichg: Yiddish for dairy products, utensils and equipment.

Pareve: A term indicating that a food does not contain either meat, poultry or dairy, and can therefore be eaten with all types of kosher ingredients. Pareve items include all fruits, vegetables, legumes, grains, eggs and kosher fish, etc.

Shechita: Torah prescribed manner of killing animals or fowl for consumption.

Shochet: A person authorized to slaughter kosher meat and poultry according to the Jewish tradition.

Treife: A term generally indicating that a particular food is not kosher.


Symbols for Pareve, Dairy and Meat Product Labeling:

K: Kosher-Pareve
KD: Kosher-Dairy
KM: Kosher-Meat
KDE: Kosher-Pareve ingredients that are produced on Dairy Equipment
KP: Kosher for Passover

Note: The “K” symbol means that the company represents the product to be kosher. There is no assurance that a Rabbi or agency certifies the product. The kosher consumer is advised to always investigate who stands behind the symbol before purchasing any product.

“Caveat Emptor.”
Although the details of kashrut (the laws governing kosher food and drink) are extensive, the laws derive from a few straightforward rules:
• Certain animals may not be eaten at all. This restriction includes the flesh, organs, eggs and milk of forbidden animals.
• Of all the animals that may be eaten, birds and mammals must be killed in accor dance with Jewish law.
• All blood must be drained from the meat or broiled out before it is eaten.
• Certain parts of permitted animals may not be eaten.
• Meat cannot be eaten with dairy. Fish, eggs, fruits, vegetables and grains can be eaten with either meat or dairy.
• Utensils that have come in contact with meat may not be used with dairy, and vice versa.
• Grape products made by non-Jews may not be eaten.

 
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